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Democrat Elizabeth Warren floats plan to empower Native Americans

Democrat Elizabeth Warren floats plan to empower Native Americans

Postby smix » Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:40 pm

Democrat Elizabeth Warren floats plan to empower Native Americans
Reuters

URL: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKCN1V61C6
Category: Politics
Published: August 16, 2019

Description: U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren on Friday unveiled her latest policy plan, which aims to empower Native American tribes through land protection and law enforcement reforms and boost financial support for chronically underfunded health and education programs. The Massachusetts senator, who faced criticism before launching her presidential campaign for claiming Native American heritage, said the United States has failed to honor its legal and moral responsibility to protect tribal nations and indigenous people.

warren-tent.jpg

“Washington owes Native communities a fighting chance to build stronger communities and a brighter future,” she said in a Medium post outlining her plan ahead of a Native American presidential forum next week. Warren’s Cherokee Nation heritage claims have dogged her since her since her first Senate run in 2012 - and intensified after President Donald Trump seized on the criticism and repeatedly called her “Pocahontas.” In February she apologized to Cherokee leaders and took a DNA test in a widely criticized effort to prove her Native American ancestry. Earlier this month Warren won a key endorsement from New Mexico Representative Deb Haaland, one of two Native American women in Congress. Part of Warren’s plan includes a legislative proposal, which she will introduce with Haaland in Congress later this year. It would guarantee federal funds for Indian health, education, roads and other programs that are usually at the mercy of annual Congressional budget fights and elevate tribal affairs to a Cabinet-level priority. It also aims to strengthen tribal sovereignty by reversing actions taken by the Trump administration to allow energy development over tribal concerns and strengthening the ability of tribes to block projects. She said she would revoke the presidential permits that have allowed the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines to proceed, reverse Trump’s reduction of national monuments, including Bears Ears - which had been formed by a consortium of southwestern tribes, and protect sacred tribal areas like New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon from mineral development. Warren’s plan would also boost federal funding to help tribal governments buy back land and hold it in federal trust. Her plan also aims to boost tribal sovereignty by reforming the tribal justice system. Her plan would give tribes - not the federal government - jurisdiction over crimes committed on their land by non-Native citizens and funding to strengthen tribal legal systems. She also announced on Friday she would create a nationwide Missing Indigenous Woman Alert System modeled after the Amber Alert for missing children to tackle the crisis of missing indigenous women.



Democratic hopeful Warren apologizes for Native American ancestry claims
Reuters

URL: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKCN1V91QY
Category: Politics
Published: August 19, 2019

Description: WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren on Monday apologized again for her claims in the 1980s that she is Native American, speaking to a crowd of tribal leaders in Iowa. “Like anyone who’s been honest with themselves, I know that I have made mistakes. I am sorry for harm I have caused. I have listened and I have learned a lot, and I am grateful for the many conversations that we’ve had together,” Warren said. Warren spoke at the Native American Presidential Forum in Sioux City, Iowa, hosted by several tribes from across the country. In February, ahead of Warren’s campaign launch, the Washington Post reported she had described herself as Native American in a form to join the Texas legal bar in the 1980s. It was the latest revelation in a six-year saga during which she has been unable to quiet critics who say she failed to recognize the importance of tribal sovereignty. Tribal leaders have criticized her claim, arguing that tribal membership is required for someone to describe themselves as Native American. Last week, Warren detailed a new policy proposal aimed at empowering Native American tribes through land protection and law enforcement reforms and boosting financial support for chronically underfunded health and education programs. Democrats in the crowded primary field vying for the party’s nomination to challenge Republican President Donald Trump in 2020 have been silent on Warren’s past Native American claims and her ancestry has not been an issue in the primary.

sitting-bullshit.jpg

Republicans, however, have reveled in mocking Warren’s previous claims of native ancestry. Some Democrats, nervous that any vulnerability in a nominee would be exploited by Trump, have worried that the Massachusetts senator handed the president an obvious attack line if she were to be the nominee. Warren’s heritage claims have dogged her since her first campaign for the U.S. Senate in 2012, when Republican Scott Brown attacked her for being listed by Harvard University as a minority when she was a member of the faculty. After Warren criticized Trump ahead of his 2016 campaign, he nicknamed her “Pocahontas” despite criticism he was being racially insensitive. Last year, after Trump offered to pay her $1 million if she took a DNA test, Warren released results of an examination of her genetics that found she had only fractional native ancestry. That angered tribal leaders who said being a Native American is not determined by DNA alone but by membership in a tribe. Trump has not paid the offered $1 million.
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Jesse Watters: Elizabeth Warren's Native American apology rings hollow because she 'stole their identity'

Postby smix » Tue Aug 20, 2019 3:37 pm

Jesse Watters: Elizabeth Warren's Native American apology rings hollow because she 'stole their identity'
Fox News

URL: https://www.foxnews.com/media/elizabeth ... gy-watters
Category: Politics
Published: August 19, 2019

Description: Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren's latest apology for previously claiming Native American heritage should fall on deaf ears, according to Jesse Watters. Watters criticized Warren Monday on "The Five," going as far as to suggest she would be an easy opponent for President Trump in 2020. "She's got terrible political instincts and she's a phony," he said, adding the Massachusetts Democrat appeared to have "scrubbed" from her campaign website the video in which she reveals her DNA results.

warren-dna-indian.jpg

"What she did to Native Americans was, some people say, a lot worse than what Trump's done to minorities. Think about what she did — she stole their identity." On Monday, Warren told a Native American forum in Sioux City, Iowa, she was sorry for any harm she caused the community. “Like anyone who has been honest with themselves, I know I have made mistakes,” she said. Elaborating on his claim, Watters said he believed Warren adopted Native American ethnicity to help herself to the detriment of others. "She used that fake identity to suppress minorities' access to higher education jobs and then she profited from the fake identity," he said, nodding to the fact Warren was employed at Harvard. "When she got busted on it when President Trump mocked her, she said, 'Oh, that's an ethnic slur: Pocahontas' — that's about as an ethnic slur as 'Fredo,' it doesn't make any sense," Watters said. Last week, CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, the brother of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and son of former Gov. Mario Cuomo, became incensed by a man who referred to him as "Fredo," a character from "The Godfather." The newsman claimed in an expletive-laden response he saw the remark as an ethnic slur against Italian-Americans. On "The Five," Watters also explained why Warren would have trouble facing off with Trump. He said the president's "Pocahontas" nickname stuck and is complemented by what he called her "irritating demeanor." "It's another landslide victory for the president if she gets the nomination."
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Two Simple Questions Elizabeth Warren Cannot, or Will Not, Answer About Her 'Native American' Fiasco

Postby smix » Fri Aug 23, 2019 8:32 am

Two Simple Questions Elizabeth Warren Cannot, or Will Not, Answer About Her 'Native American' Fiasco
Townhall

URL: https://townhall.com/tipsheet/guybenson ... x-n2552015
Category: Politics
Published: August 22, 2019

Description: Earlier this week, Elizabeth earned plaudits from her most devoted fans -- denizens of elite coastal newsrooms -- for apologizing to Native Americans at a forum she attended. The Massachusetts Senator acknowledged that she'd made "mistakes" and caused "harm," but failed to detail what, specifically, those harmful mistakes actually were.

warren-headdress.jpg

Her campaign also memory-holed her disastrous DNA stunt video, which had been hailed by some in the press as brilliant when it was first released, only to slide into the "problematic" column when (once again) genuine Native Americans strongly objected to the nature of her supposed "proof." Out: This dodgy evidence shows I was (1/64th to 1/1,024th) right all along! In: I'm really sorry for unspecified errors. And so, for the umpteenth time, Warren is trying to put this nagging controversy behind her. She can't do so, however, until she persuasively and compellingly addresses two fundamental questions.
(1) Is she a Native American -- as in still, to this day? Her response to this has been to deflect, instead answering different but related questions. She asserts that she is not a member of a tribe, an about-face from her longtime claims of being a Cherokee, and that she is not a woman of color. She was bludgeoned into the first reversal under harsh criticism from real Cherokees. The second point is more perplexing. Are Native Americans...not people of color? A Native American candidate forum attendee seemed understandably and suitably confused during an appearance on MSNBC:
“Is Elizabeth Warren going to be a woman of color?” a Native American woman asked during an interview with MSNBC at the Sioux City forum. “She says she is not,” an MSNBC reporter replied. “How can she say she’s not when she took a DNA test stating she is?” the woman fired back. “So she’s either one of us or she’s not.”

Warren recently told a liberal podcaster that her supposed Native American identity is "what I believe," but quickly emphasized the tribe and person of color caveats. But setting those caveats off to the side, the core issue remains: Does Warren still consider herself a Native American? Like, now, today. If so, based on what actual evidence? And how does that square with saying that she's not a person of color? If she says she no longer considers herself a Native American, that's a costly admission that she exploited an inaccurate identity, either out of calculating malice or insulting ignorance. If she says she is a Native American, we're back to the glaring problem of, you know, evidence. So there's a reason why she is avoiding this seemingly simple question. She knows it's a trap, and that she set it for herself.
(2) Why did she stop listing herself as a Native American just after securing tenure at Harvard Law School? Warren claims that she did not gain any financial or professional benefit from formally classifying herself as a racial minority in the 1980's and 1990's, but powerful circumstantial evidence and common sense suggest that's not true. Documents chronicle how she flipped from categorizing herself as a white person to a Native American just months before she was hired into the Ivy League for the first time, during a period in which elite institutions were under heavy fire for non-diverse faculties. She proceeded to continue to check the 'Native American' box in a key professional directory, widely known to be consulted by hiring deans, for roughly a decade -- abruptly ceasing this self-classification upon being granted a tenured position at Harvard, the peak of her trajectory. I suppose Warren could concoct any number of reasons why she began listing herself as a Native American when she did. It's a lot harder to explain the highly suspicious timing of her reversion back to being a white person. To my knowledge, she's only attempted to justify this incriminating timeline once, and it was embarrassingly weak:
Warren's explanation to the Boston Herald was that she listed herself as a minority in the hopes that she would be invited to a luncheon so she could meet "people who are like I am" and she stopped checking the box when that didn't happen. Perhaps it "didn't happen" because at no point, at any of the schools she attended or worked at, is there any evidence that Warren ever joined any Native American organizations on campus or in any way interacted with anyone in the Native American community.

Not only is this absurd-sounding on its face, it was directly refuted by real Native Americans who were at Harvard contemporaneously:
Dr. Gavin Clarkson, a citizen of the Choctaw Nation who received both a doctorate and a law degree from Harvard while Warren was a professor, says he "personally invited" her three times to visit with Harvard's Native American Law Student Association (NALSA), which he headed while attaining his dual degree. Warren, who had identified as a minority in law professor directories and was touted by Harvard as a Native American hire, never accepted his invites. "I was on campus at Harvard for five years, from 1998 to 2003," Clarkson said. "Warren was identified in the AALS law teacher directory as an American Indian faculty member." "Hi, we're the Native American students on campus and it would be nice to meet the only Native American professor on the faculty," was the message Clarkson was attempting to get across, but he says he was dismissed by Warren every time.

Her initial explanation was silly and implausible. The refutation blows it out of the water. So, really, why did Warren stop listing herself as a Native American when she did? Warren should not be allowed to wriggle free from this scandal until she convincingly, specifically, and thoroughly addresses both of the questions laid out above. The most obvious explanation for her conduct is that she seized on dubious family folklore at an opportune moment, in order to exploit diversity push for her own personal advancement, dropping the unethical ruse as soon as it was no longer useful to her. If there's stronger evidence that points in another direction, let's hear it. The trouble for Warren, I think, is that she literally cannot answer these two elementary questions in a satisfactory way, and that exculpatory evidence does not exist.



Fauxahontas Was Caught In Another Lie. This One Is About Her Previous Career As a Teacher.
Townhall

URL: https://townhall.com/tipsheet/bethbauma ... u-n2554232
Category: Politics
Published: October 5, 2019

Description: Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has repeatedly said she was a special needs school teacher but she was fired because she was "visibly pregnant." It's become part of her typical stomping speech, a part of her so-called "resume."
Elizabeth Warren says that she probably would still would be a special needs teacher today, if she hadn't gotten fired for being visibly pregnant (in the days before unions).
— Rebecca Klein (@rklein90) May 13, 2019

Warren talking about getting fired because a principal gave her teaching job away because Warren was visibly pregnant. She said she went to law school and then went back to teaching. She ends with a pitch: "I know what's broken. I want to be in the fight to fix it for America."
— Yamiche Alcindor (@Yamiche) September 13, 2019

It turns out Warrens' narrative was nothing but a lie. During a 2007 interview with Harvard Law Professor Leo Gottlieb, Warren explained the education she obtained. She graduated from high school at 16 and received a full ride scholarship to George Washington University as long as she took part in their debate team. She obtained a degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology. She taught for a year and started graduate school to obtain her certificate so she could receive a permanent position at the school. She ultimately walked away from teaching and went to law school. "I was married at nineteen and graduated from college after I’d married, and my first year post-graduation I worked in a public school system with the children with disabilities. I did that for a year, and then that summer I didn’t have the education courses, so I was on an 'emergency certificate,' it was called," Warren explained. "I went back to graduate school and took a couple of courses in education and said, 'I don’t think this is going to work out for me.' I was pregnant with my first baby, so I had a baby and stayed home for a couple of years, and I was really casting about, thinking, 'What am I going to do?' My husband’s view of it was, 'Stay home. We have children, we’ll have more children, you’ll love this.' And I was very restless about it." "So, I went back home to Oklahoma — by this point we were living in New Jersey because of his job — I went back home to Oklahoma for Christmas and saw a bunch of the boys that I had been in high school debate with and they’d all gone on to law school, and they said, 'You should go to law school. You’ll love it,'" Warren recounted. "'I said, 'You really think so?' And they said, 'Of all of us, you should have gone to law school. You’re the one who should’ve gone to law school.' So, I took the tests, applied to law school, and the day my daughter, who later became my co-author, turned two, I started law school at Rutgers Law School in New Jersey, which at the time had the nickname of being the 'People’s Electric Law Company,' a really crazy place. Apparently, lying is just part of Warren's campaign. First, she lied about being Native American. Then a DNA test revealed she's only 1/1024th Native American. Now she's fluffing up her background and changing her tune because a different narrative benefits her. The lie after lie shows that Warren knows she's an elitist who most Americans cannot relate to. She doesn't understand their worries and their struggles. And lying to make it seem as though she understands the struggle just digs her deeper into a hole.
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Elizabeth Warren Has Spent Her Adult Life Repeating A Lie. I Want Her To Tell The Truth.

Postby smix » Sat Aug 24, 2019 1:21 am

Elizabeth Warren Has Spent Her Adult Life Repeating A Lie. I Want Her To Tell The Truth.
Huffington Post

URL: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/elizabet ... cbd48a1b01
Category: Politics
Published: August 23, 2019

Description: Elizabeth Warren, apologizing to Native leaders on Monday, said, “I know I’ve made mistakes. I am sorry for harm I have caused.” For many people, that apology put the issue to rest. But many Native advocates, myself included, were not satisfied. Warren still has work to do, and demanding she do what’s left is beyond reasonable. In all of her apologizing, Warren has never let go of her family story. After spending her entire adult life repeating a lie, I simply want Warren to tell the truth.

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In 1836, Warren’s great-great-great-grandfather, a white man named William Marsh, enlisted himself in a Tennessee militia to fight in the “Cherokee War,” an occupation of Cherokee land in the lead-up to the Trail of Tears. Decades later, his grandson John Houston Crawford moved his family onto Indian Territory and squatted on Cherokee land in a move that, with no record of a permit, was almost certainly illegal. The Crawfords were just some of the tens of thousands of white squatters who outnumber Cherokees on our own land. While Cherokee Nation beseeched Congress to enforce our treaty rights and kick them out, the squatters pushed Congress to divide up our treaty territory and create a path to white land ownership; the squatters won. The Crawfords settled in the new state of Oklahoma. They lived among Indians, but it wasn’t always peaceful. In 1906, John Crawford shot a Creek man for hitting his son. According to The Boston Globe, his son, Rosco, would later tell stories about how “mean” the Indians were. But one of Crawford’s grandchildren, Pauline Reed, told a very different story. Not a story of living among Indians, a story of being Indian. Pauline’s youngest child, Elizabeth, grew up with her mother’s version of the story. And though the family had no evidence or relationship to the tribe, Elizabeth Warren never questioned it, she wrote in her memoir. It was her family story, she would say. The story of Warren‘s family traces the history of Cherokee Nation, but we sit on opposite sides of that history. Like many other white families, Warren’s ancestors replaced the truth of their complicity in Cherokee dispossession with a tale of being Cherokee. If that’s not wrong, if that’s not racist, I don’t know what is.

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I do not fault Warren for believing what she was told as a child. But in 2019, Warren isn’t a kid anymore. She is a United States senator running for president. If she is not in a position that demands accountability and truth, who is? The center of this controversy is not Warren’s political career, it is Cherokee sovereignty and self-determination. The monster I am trying to wrestle to the ground is not one white woman who claimed to be Cherokee. It is the hundreds of thousands of white people claiming to be Cherokee and the broad social acceptance that emboldens them. It threatens the future of my tribe. Warren is just the most public example. When white people took over our land, they outnumbered us. Today, Cherokees are once again outnumbered by outsiders, claiming not our land, but our identity. In the last U.S. census, there were more white people claiming to be Cherokee than there are Cherokee citizens enrolled in our tribes. These fakes are writing our history, selling our art, representing us to the United Nations, fighting for the same legal status as our tribe, and stealing millions of dollars from federal programs set aside for people of color. And they all have stories that sound just like Warren’s. I already know what people will say. They will say that many people have Cherokee ancestors but don’t have evidence, falsely believing that Cherokees were too primitive to have a paper trail when our literacy rates were higher than those of white people. They will say their great-grandmother was too proud to sign the Dawes Rolls, falsely believing the U.S. government gave Indians the option when some who refused were arrested. They will say the DNA test proves Warren is Cherokee, falsely believing that Western science knows Indigenous communities better than we know ourselves. Tribal affiliation and kinship determine Cherokee identity — not race or biology. At a time when the far right is equating Native identity with race to undermine Native rights, the myths that lie in the wake of Warren’s missteps are extremely dangerous. Yes, she apologized, but we are left cleaning up the mess she made. Warren’s policy platform and admission to harm is a good first step. But a complete apology is working to repair the harm you caused. There is no one in the world who has more power to correct the harmful myths perpetuated by this saga than Elizabeth Warren herself. She simply needs to state she does not have a Cherokee ancestor and that she was wrong to claim one. Until then, Cherokee people will be left fighting the mountain of confusion she caused. And I am terrified we will lose.
--
Rebecca Nagle is a writer, advocate and citizen of Cherokee Nation living in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.
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Elizabeth Warren Ancestor Rounded Up Cherokees For Trail of Tears

Postby smix » Sat Aug 24, 2019 1:53 am

Elizabeth Warren Ancestor Rounded Up Cherokees For Trail of Tears
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2012 ... -of-tears/
Category: Politics
Published: May 8, 2012

Description: For over a quarter of a century, Elizabeth Warren has described herself as a Native American. When recently asked to provide evidence of her ancestry, she pointed to an unsubstantiated claim on an 1894 Oklahoma Territory marriage license application by her great-great grand uncle William J. Crawford that his mother, O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford, Ms. Warren’s great-great-great grandmother, was a Cherokee.

warren-high-cheekbones.jpg

After researching her story, it is obvious that her “family lore” is just fiction. As I pointed out in my article here on Sunday, no evidence supports this claim. O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford had no Cherokee heritage, was listed as “white” in the Census of 1860, and was most likely half Swedish and half English, Scottish, or German, or some combination thereof. (Note, the actual 1894 marriage license makes no claim of Cherokee ancestry.) But the most stunning discovery about the life of O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford is that her husband, Ms. Warren’s great-great-great grandfather, was apparently a member of the Tennessee Militia who rounded up Cherokees from their family homes in the Southeastern United States and herded them into government-built stockades in what was then called Ross’s Landing (now Chattanooga), Tennessee–the point of origin for the horrific Trail of Tears, which began in January, 1837. This new information about Ms. Warren’s true heritage came as a direct result of a lead provided to me by William Jacobson over at Legal Insurrection, who in turn had received the information from one of his readers. Jacobson, who has questioned Warren’s explanation for her law faculty listing, calls this discovery “the ultimate and cruelest irony” of the Warren Cherokee saga. Jonathan Crawford, O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford’s husband and apparently Ms. Warren’s great-great-great grandfather, served in the East Tennessee Mounted Infantry Volunteer Militia commanded by Brigadier General R. G. Dunlap from late 1835 to late 1836. While under Dunlap’s command he was a member of Major William Lauderdale’s Battalion, and Captain Richard E. Waterhouse’s Company. These were the troops responsible for removing Cherokee families from homes they had lived in for generations in the three states that the Cherokee Nations had considered their homelands for centuries: Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. While these involuntary home removals were not characterized by widespread violence, the newly displaced Cherokee mothers, fathers, and children found an oppressive and sometimes brutal welcome when they finally arrived at the hastily constructed containment areas. An estimated 4,000 Cherokees were warehoused in Ross’s Landing stockades for months awaiting supplies and additional armed guards the Federal Government believed necessary to relocate them on foot to Oklahoma. Jonathan Crawford most likely did not join the regular Army troops who “escorted” these Cherokees along the Trail of Tears. He did, however, serve once more with Major William Lauderdale’s re-formed Batallion of Tennessee Mounted Infantry Volunteer Militia. This group fought the Seminole Indians in Florida during the Second Seminole War. Crawford arrived in Florida in November, 1837, and served there for six months until his unit was disbanded in Baton Rouge, Louisiana the following May. (Note: It was not uncommon in those days for militia formed to serve for a limited period of time under specific commanders would reform later under the same commanders.) Jonathan Crawford’s service as a Private in Captain Richard E. Waterhouse’s Company of Major William Lauderdale’s Battalion of Mounted Infantry in Brigadier General R. G. Dunlap’s East Tennessee Mounted Infantry Volunteers is confirmed by his appearance in the muster roll of the Brigade, taken around June of 1836. (Note that this transcription of the muster roll incorrectly lists the date as 1832.) His service a year later (1837) in Major William Lauderdale’s Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Infantry (Five companies of volunteers, one of which was led by Captain Richard E. Waterhouse) is confirmed by his widow O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford’s 1851 pension application before the Bledsoe County, Tennessee commissioners. Meanwhile, William J. Crawford (Elizabeth Warren’s great-great grandfather who would, fifty-seven years later, falsely claim that his mother was Cherokee in that now-infamous 1894 Oklahoma Territory marriage license application) was born in Bledsoe County, Tennessee in 1837. This was just a few months after his father apparently helped remove thousands of Cherokees from their homes and a few months before his father went off to fight Seminole Indians in Florida. His father, Jonathan Crawford, Elizabeth Warren’s great-great-great grandfather, died in Jackson County, Tennessee in 1841. His mother, O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford, died sometime between 1860 and 1870 – most likely in Bledsoe County, Tennessee. Neither O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford, Jonathan Crawford, nor any of their seven other children, apparently ever claimed that O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford had Cherokee heritage. As recently as two weeks ago, Ms. Warren publicly claimed to have Native American ancestry. In Dorchester, Massachusetts on April 27 at the Bricklayers and Allied Craftsmen Apprentice Training Center she stated, “I am very proud of my Native American heritage.” Yet, decades after she first made this same claim, it now appears that it is without any foundation. It is time for Ms. Warren to publicly acknowledge the truth of her ancestry. It is time for her to admit that she has no Native American heritage that she can prove; and it is time for her to acknowledge instead, that she is likely a direct descendant of a Tennessee Militiaman who apparently rounded up the ancestors of those who truly have Cherokee heritage, the first step in their forced removal from the Southeastern United States to Oklahoma over the long and tragic Trail of Tears.



Elizabeth Warren a Direct Descendant of Militia ‘Indian Fighter’ Who Fought Seminole Tribe
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... ole-tribe/
Category: Politics
Published: September 12, 2019

Description: Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-MA) great-great-great grandfather Jonathan Crawford served in Major William Lauderdale’s Battalion of Tennessee Volunteer Militia from November 1837 to May 1838, a six month time period during which it fought two battles in Florida against the Seminoles. Today, there are two federally recognized Native American Seminole tribes, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, which has 4,000 enrolled members, and the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, which has more than 18,000 enrolled members. Lauderdale’s battalion fought against the Seminoles at the Battle of Loxahatchee River, in present-day Jupiter, Florida, on January 24, 1838. Then on March 22, 1838, they fought against the Seminoles again at the Battle of Pine Island, in present-day Fort Lauderdale. A native of Virginia, Lauderdale moved to Tennessee, where he was known as the latest in a long line of Indian fighters, as the Daily Press reported in 1992:
Like other Virginians of his day, Lauderdale developed into an Indian fighter. In 1803 he marched as a Tennessee volunteer to the Louisiana Territory to fight for the United States against the Spanish and the Indians. In the War of 1812 he served under Gen. Jackson and fought against the Indian allies of the British in what are now Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. ,,, William Lauderdale became Gen. Jackson’s trusted understudy in the War of 1812. When the Creek Indians rose up to massacre white settlers in Alabama in 1813 and President James Madison ordered Jackson to defend the area, Capt. Lauderdale and his Tennessee Vols helped win the battle of Talladega. Lauderdale went on to play a part in Jackson’s defeat of the British in the battle of New Orleans in 1815, which ended the War of 1812.

Evidence supporting Jonathan Crawford’s service under Lauderdale in Florida was brought by his widow, Neoma O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford, also known as Neona Crawford, to the Bledsoe County Commission of Bledsoe County, Tennessee in 1850 and 1851, when she applied for a pension from the U.S. government for her husband’s service during the 1837-1838 Second Seminole War. Thursday is debate night in Houston, and Warren is one of the ten candidates seeking the 2020 Democrat presidential nomination who will be on stage. The debate is hosted by ABC and Univision and will be moderated by ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, David Muir, Linsey Davis, and Univision’s Jorge Ramos. In the first two debates among candidates vying for the 2020 Democrat presidential nomination, hosted by CNN and MSNBC, Warren faced no questions about her false claims of Native American ancestry. Neoma O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford is Sen. Warren’s great-great-great-grandmother. She and Jonathan Crawford were parents of Sen. Warren’s great-great-grandfather Preston H.Crawford. In that time period, widows of soldiers who served the United States in the Tennessee Militia began their request for pensions at the county level. William Brown, the chairman of the Bledsoe County Court in 1851, offered these observations about Neoma O.C. Sarah Smith Crawford’s request for a pension when it was brought to his attention. According to an entry in Sequatchie Valley Revolutionary War Soldiers, which was confirmed to Breitbart News on Wednesday by James Douthat, who compiled and published the book at his company, Mountain Press:
Wm. Brown, Chmn of County Court, requests increase in Sibby Reed’s pension; mentions Thomas Pope of Sparta; and on October 12, 1851 writes that JONATHAN CRAWFORD was a Private in Capt. Richard Waterhouse’s Company in the “Florida War” and died shortly after his return, from disease contracted there. Is not his widow entitled to a pension?

Douthat also confirmed that records show Jonathan Crawford was enrolled in Captain Richard Waterhouse’s company during the Second Seminole War from 1837 to 1838. The pension for which Neona Crawford, widow of Private Jonathan Crawford, applied in Bledsoe County in 1850 and 1851 was granted by the U.S. Department of War for Neona in 1853. She received a pension of $3.50 per month for a period of six years, ending in 1859. The pension was apparently administered out of the U.S. Department of War’s offices located in Knoxville, Tennessee. You can see the image of the record of that pension here:

NeanaCrawfordWidowsPension.jpg

Jonathan Crawford is the same ancestor of Elizabeth Warren who one year earlier in 1836 served in the Tennessee Militia that rounded up Cherokees living in Tennessee at the beginning of the Trail of Tears. Crawford was among 600 Tennesseans who volunteered to serve in the battallion recruited by William Lauderdale to fight against the Seminoles in Florida. The Seminole Tribe of Florida offers this description of the Second Seminole War in which Elizabeth Warren’s great-great-great grandfather fought against them:
Through the Treaty of Moultrie Creek (1823), the Treaty of Payne’s Landing (1832), and numerous “talks” and meetings, US Indian Agents sought to convince the Florida Indians to sell their cattle and pigs to the US government, return runaway slaves to their “rightful owners,” leave their ancient homelands in Florida, and move west of the Mississippi River to Arkansas Territory. In 1830, soon after Jackson the Indian fighter became Andrew Jackson, the president of the United States, he pushed through Congress an Indian Removal Act. With this Act, the determination of the government to move Indians out of the Southeast and open the land for white settlement became the official policy of the US, and the willingness of the government to spend monies in support of military enforcement of this policy increased. The clash that inevitably resulted from this policy finally began in 1835, and the seven years that it lasted frame the last, the greatest, and arguably the most tragic years in the history of US-Indian relations east of the Mississippi River. Known to history as the Second Seminole War, the US government committed almost $40,000,000 to the forced removal of slightly more than 3,000 Maskókî men, women, and children from Florida to Oklahoma. This was the only Indian war in US history in which not only the US army but also the US navy and marine corps participated. Together with the desultory Third Seminole War, a series of skirmishes that took place between 1856 and 1858, the United States spent much of the first half of the 19th century in trying, unsuccessfully, to dislodge about 5,000 Seminoles from Florida. Unlike the “Trail of Tears” that took place in a single, dreadful moment, in 1838, in which several thousand Cherokee people were sent on a death march to the West, the removals of the Seminole people from Florida began earlier and lasted 20 years longer. Just like that other event, however, the toll in human suffering was profound and the stain on the honor of a great nation, the United States, can never be erased. The Seminole people – men, women, and children, were hunted with bloodhounds, rounded up like cattle, and forced onto ships that carried them to New Orleans and up the Mississippi. Together with several hundred of the African ex-slaves who had fought with them, they were then sent overland to Fort Gibson (Arkansas), and on to strange and inhospitable new lands where they were attacked by other tribes, in a fierce competition for the scarce resources that they all needed to survive.

William Lauderdale, the commander of the battalion in which Warren’s ancestor fought, was a close ally of Andrew Jackson. “Lauderdale was a friend of President Andrew Jackson. The two were neighbors in Tennessee. Jackson asked Lauderdale to take his Tennessee Volunteers to Florida to help in capturing the Seminoles in South Florida to make the area safer for settlers,” the South Florida Sun Sentinel reported in this 1988 article:
Lauderdale arrived on March 5 [1838] and began to build a military post, named Fort Lauderdale, on the banks of New River at Southwest Ninth Avenue.J The city of Fort Lauderdale, named after the fort, was founded 57 years later in 1895. Forts in those days were named after the commanding officer of the men who built them On March 22, 1838, Lauderdale and 600 men participated in a skirmish of the Second Seminole War on Pine Island. They drove 50 to 100 Indian warriors and their women and children off the island. The soldiers had pushed and pulled their boats through 15 miles of the shallow Everglades and arrived at the settlement exhausted, according to Fort Lauderdale historian Cooper Kirk, who has written a biography of Lauderdale. . . Kirk says after the Seminole wars there were only 299 Indians left in Florida. Before the wars he says there were not a great number, only 4,500 to 4,800. About 4,000 Seminoles were taken to settlements in Oklahoma. Today, 1,700 Seminoles reside in Florida.

Jonathan Crawford mustered out of Lauderdale’s Battalion at New Orleans, Louisiana, in May 1838, and returned to Tennessee. He died there in 1841. Breitbart News asked Sen. Warren for comment on this story multiple times through her presidential campaign but did not receive a response. Specifically, Breitbart News asked Sen. Warren’s presidential campaign this question:
In light of her long record of false claims of Native American ancestry, is Sen. Warren prepared to apologize to Native Americans around the country for making those false claims and acknowledge that her personal heritage includes a direct connection to those who rounded up Cherokees for the Trail of Tears, as well as those who fought against the Seminoles in Florida?

As Breitbart News reported earlier, Sen. Warren is a direct descendant of Jonathan Crawford, “Indian fighter.”
Here are the five generations between Elizabeth Warren and Jonathan Houston Crawford, as documented by Cherokee genealogist Twila Barnes at her website, Polly’s Granddaughter, which is summarized here:
* Generation 1 (1/2 or 50 percent ancestry), Elizabeth Warren’s mother:
Pauline Louise Reed, the mother of Ms. Warren, was the child of Harry G. Reed and Bethania “Hannie” Crawford. She was born in Hughes County, Oklahoma, on February 14, 1912. She was found on the 1920 US Census living in Hickory Ridge, Okfuskee County, Oklahoma with her parents and siblings, race listed as white. She was found on the 1930 US Census living in Wetumka, Hughes County, Oklahoma with her parents, race listed as white. She married Don Herring on January 2, 1932 in Hughes County, Oklahoma. She was found on the 1940 US Censusliving in Wetumka, Hughes County, Oklahoma with her husband and children, race listed as white. She died July 18, 1995.
* Generation 2 (1/4 or 25 percent ancestry), Elizabeth Warren’s grandmother:
Bethania Elvina “Hannie” Crawford: born 29 Oct 1875 in Laclede County, Missouri; died 11 Nov 1969 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, was the child of John Houston Crawford and Paulina Ann Bowen. She married Harry Gunn Reed on June 2, 1893 in Sebastian, Arkansas.
* Generation 3 (1/8 or 12.5 percent ancestry), Elizabeth Warren’s great-grandfather
John Houston Crawford: born 26 Mar 1858 in Laclede County, Missouri; died 23 Jan 1924 in Hughes County, Oklahoma, was the child of Preston H. Crawford and Edith May Marsh. He married Paulina Ann Bowen. A 1907 newspaper article described John H. Crawford as a “white man” who shot at an Indian.
* Generation 4 (1/16 or 6.25 percent ancestry), Elizabeth Warren’s great-great-grandfather
Preston H Crawford:born 1824 in Tennessee; died 1875 in Laclede County, Missouri, was the child of Jonathan H. Crawford and O.C. Sarah Smith. He married Edith May Marsh.
* Generation 5 (1/32 or 3.125 percent ancestry), Elizabeth Warren’s great-great-great grandfather
According to findagrave.com, Jonathan Houston Crawford was born in Tennessee in 1795, married Neoma “Oma” C. Sarah Smith in Bledsoe County, Tennessee in 1819, and died in Jackson County, Tennessee. They had 8 children, including Preston J. born about 1824, and William J. Crawford born about 1838, who married Mary Longworth in Oklahoma in 1894.

The Battle of the Loxahatchee will be re-enacted at Loxahatchee River Battlefield Park in Jupiter, Florida on January 24 and 25, 2020. Jonathan Crawford may not have been the only ancestor of Elizabeth Warren who either rounded up or fought Native Americans. Last month Rebecca Nagle, a Native American progressive activist who has been critical of Sen. Warren’s false claims of Native American ancestry and the professional benefit she obtained from making those claims, stated that William Marsh, another great-great-grandfather of Warren, also served in the Tennessee Militia that rounded up Cherokees in 1836. William Marsh’ sdaughter, Edith May Marsh, married Jonathan Crawford’s son, Preston H. Crawford. John Houston Crawford, Elizabeth Warren’s great-grandfather, was their son.



Flashback: Warren Claimed to Have ‘Plenty of Pictures’ Highlighting Native American Heritage
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... -heritage/
Category: Politics
Published: October 5, 2019

Description: A video of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has resurfaced, showing the then-Senate candidate claiming to possess “plenty of pictures” highlighting her Native American heritage. A reporter asked Warren in the 2012 video if she possessed “anything in the house that reflects her Native American heritage.” Warren said she did, but refused to show the items.

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“I have plenty of pictures. They’re not for you,” Warren replied:



Another resurfaced clip shows Warren doubling down on her Native ancestry claims, telling the story of her parents. She claimed her family was divided due to her father’s parents’ prejudice against her mother, who was – Warren claimed – part Cherokee and Delaware. “It was an issue in our family the whole time I grew up, about these two families,” Warren told New England Cable News’s Jim Braude. Braude followed up, asking Warren – who identified as a minority – if she would still identify as such if her ancestors were black instead. “If your family heritage had an African American like you have, the grandfather or great grandparent who was a Cherokee, would you call yourself a black, and expect African Americans to accept that?” Braude asked. “If that same ancestor was black and not Cherokee,” he added. “If my Father’s parents had said, ‘You can’t marry her because she’s black, and that had been part of our family growing up, that we had two different families?” Warren replied. “You would be comfortable with saying you’re black?” Braude asked. “It would be part of identification,” she said:
Elizabeth Warren says her parents had to elope because she was part Cherokee and part Delaware. This entire situation is worse than I had thought.

warren-defines.jpg

— Alyta DeLeon (@AlytaDeLeon) September 28, 2019

The Massachusetts senator has been under fire for identifying as a minority in the past, listing herself as a minority professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Harvard Law School. She also claimed Native American heritage on her Texas Bar registration card:
Elizabeth Warren filled out a form for the State Bar of Texas in 1986 claiming American Indian heritage, according to documents reviewed by The Post

— The Washington Post (@washingtonpost) February 6, 2019

Warren has tried to put her claims of Native American heritage behind her, but a DNA test – taken last year – revealed that Warren had between 1/64th and 1/1,024 Native American ancestry. The results followed years of Warren’s claims of Native American heritage, citing her high cheekbones as physical proof. Additionally, the DNA results indicated an association with individuals from Colombia, Mexico, and Peru– not Native American tribes in the United States, further debunking her claims of Cherokee heritage, specifically.

warren-redskin.jpg

Warren has since admitted that she is “not a person of color” and “not a citizen of a tribe” and has called her decision to identify as a minority for years on end a “mistake,” although she has yet to offer a detailed explanation for making the claims for years without solid proof. “Like anyone who’s been honest with themselves, I know that I have made mistakes,” Warren told the crowd at the Native American Presidential Forum in Sioux City, Iowa, in August. “I am sorry for harm I have caused.” “I have listened and I have learned a lot, and I am grateful for the many conversations we have had together,” she added: President Trump joked at a rally in August that he “did the Pocahontas thing” a bit too early but signaled that he will revive it if Warren scores the Democrat nomination. “I did the Pocahontas thing. I hit her really hard, and it looked like she was down and out, but that was too long ago,” told the crowd in New Hampshire. “I should have waited. But don’t worry, we will revive it. It can be revived. It will be revived. And it can be revived very easily, and very quickly, and we’re gonna have some fun in the state of New Hampshire,” he added.



Cherokee Professor Slams Warren Staffer Who Allegedly Dismissed His Concerns: ‘Profoundly Colonial’
Breitbart News

URL: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019 ... -colonial/
Category: Politics
Published: October 7, 2019

Description: A Cherokee professor from Stony Brook University claimed that a staffer from Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-MA) campaign dismissed his concerns that Warren had not done enough to “right the harm she has caused” by falsely claiming Cherokee heritage for years, and added that the staffer’s claim – that Trump will be re-elected if he does not support Warren – is “profoundly colonial.” The professor and member of Cherokee Nation, Joseph Pierce, said on Twitter Saturday that Warren staffers attempted to persuade him to vote for the presidential hopeful during a campaign drive. Pierce told one staffer that he was not happy with the way Warren falsely claimed Native American heritage, and noted that she had not “done enough to right the harm she has caused.” The staffer told Pierce that he would get him in touch with someone “who could get the word to Elizabeth” and brought him to another staffer, whom Pierce described as a “white guy with a beard.” The professor told the staffer that he was Cherokee, but the conversation was seemingly cut short after the staffer asked for Pierce’s number so he could “make real time” for him. “I say, ‘this really pisses me off.’ And then things change: he can see that I’m upset, and then tries to figure out if I am worth talking to after all,” Pierce wrote on Twitter, adding that the staffer ultimately said, “I’m not sure there is anything I can do for you.” Pierce said he told the staffer, “Tell her, tell someone, that what she has done is not enough.” He noted the fact that the staffer was not as interested in talking to him once he realized he had passionate thoughts on the issue. “I mean, bro, just one second earlier you were willing to ‘make real time for me,’ and when you saw that I actually have thoughts about this, you no longer have that willingness or that time,” Pierce wrote. “That, my friend, is exactly the problem.” Pierce added that the staffer told him that, by not voting for Warren, Trump would be re-elected. He called the staffer’s assertion “profoundly colonial.” “This is the position they are putting us in, and it is profoundly colonial,” he assessed. “Profoundly”:
the guy said that he would take me to someone "who could get the word to Elizabeth." Intrigued, I go with him, and its a white guy with a beard, and we interrupt his conversation, because its important, and I say, "I'm Cherokee" and he nods…
— Joseph M. Pierce (@PepePierce) October 5, 2019

He says, "I'm not sure there is anything I can do for you". And it dawns on me, yes, I am upset, perhaps I'm not willing to have this conversation, perhaps I just want to yell. So I say, "tell her, tell someone, that what she has done is not enough."
— Joseph M. Pierce (@PepePierce) October 5, 2019

And he had the gall to say that if I didn’t vote for her it was going to get Trump re-elected. This is the position they are putting us in, and it is profoundly colonial. Profoundly.
— Joseph M. Pierce (@PepePierce) October 6, 2019

Pierce blasted the “apology” Warren offered at the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum in August, calling it “woefully inadequate”:
So, I didn’t expect Warren to spell out the complex history of Cherokee identity, the background of the allotment era and the theft of Indian land, identity, language, and culture by white settlers—including members of her own family. I didn’t expect her to be nuanced. But I hoped she might actually say, simply, that she is not and never has been Cherokee. That was my hope. And I was disappointed. Warren vaguely admitted wrongdoing. But she did not say what she did or why, quickly pivoting to her strong suit, public policy. This is a good strategy for courting people who wanted to hear her admit something. However, it doesn’t address the central issue at stake—Cherokee sovereignty.

“Like anyone who’s been honest with themselves, I know that I have made mistakes,” Warren told the crowd at the forum. “I am sorry for harm I have caused”: Warren – who identified as a minority professor and listed herself as an “American Indian” on her Texas Bar registration card – has failed to go into detail on her false claims to Native American heritage, offering vague apologies and largely avoiding the subject. The results of Warren’s DNA test released last year revealed the presidential hopeful’s lack of Native American heritage. As Breitbart News reported:
Warren has tried to put her claims of Native American heritage behind her, but a DNA test – taken last year – revealed that Warren had between 1/64th and 1/1,024 Native American ancestry. The results followed years of Warren’s claims of Native American heritage, citing her high cheekbones as physical proof. Additionally, the DNA results indicated an association with individuals from Colombia, Mexico, and Peru– not Native American tribes in the United States, further debunking her claims of Cherokee heritage, specifically.

A recently resurfaced video from Warren’s 2012 senatorial bid shows the lawmaker claiming to have “plenty of pictures” reflecting her Native American heritage but ultimately refusing to show them to the reporter.

Image

“I have plenty of pictures,” Warren said. “They’re not for you.”
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‘Pocahontas’ Could Still Be Elizabeth Warren’s Biggest Vulnerability

Postby smix » Tue Aug 27, 2019 4:13 pm

‘Pocahontas’ Could Still Be Elizabeth Warren’s Biggest Vulnerability
Politico

URL: https://www.politico.com/magazine/story ... ity-227912
Category: Politics
Published: August 27, 2019

Description: Sure, she calmed nervous progressives. But it’s moderates who might be susceptible to Trump’s attack on her honesty.

warren-cherokee.jpg

Elizabeth Warren came to last week’s Native American presidential forum in Sioux City, Iowa, with, as you might expect, a plan. And she executed it perfectly. First, the Massachusetts senator expressed sorrow for the “harm I caused,” referencing her attempt to prove he had Native American ancestry through a DNA test. Then she pivoted to her literal plan, her sweeping and detailed set of ideas to expand tribal nation sovereignty and invest in social programs benefiting Native American communities. The long list of proposals was repeatedly praised by the forum’s attendees, several of whom excitedly predicted that they were speaking to the next president of the United States. While Warren’s campaign staff might have breathed easier coming out of the forum, her Republican antagonists have made it clear they have no intention of forgetting the episode. Shortly before Warren’s appearance at the forum, the Republican National Committee released an opposition research memo titled, “1/1024th Native American, 100% Liar,” which quoted its deputy chief of staff Mike Reed as saying, Warren "lied about being [Native American] to gain minority status at a time when Ivy League law schools were desperate to add diversity to their ranks.” A few days earlier, President Donald Trump, after lamenting that “Pocahontas is rising” in the polls, assured his supporters at a New Hampshire rally that he still has the ability to derail her: “I did the Pocahontas thing. I hit her really hard, and it looked like she was down and out. But that was too long ago. I should’ve waited. But don’t worry, we will revive it.” Has Warren effectively addressed the controversy? In conversations I had with Democratic and Republican political strategists, unaffiliated with any presidential campaign, there was no bipartisan consensus. The Democrats believed Warren’s rise in the polls is evidence she has weathered the storm. The Republicans argued Warren remains vulnerable to charges of dishonest opportunism. They’re both right. Warren is enjoying a comeback because she has convinced many skittish progressives that she won’t let Trump disrupt her relentless focus on policy solutions. And she has convinced many Native American leaders that her policy proposals for indigenous communities are more important than what she has said in the past about her ancestry. But because Warren’s comeback has relied on restoring her standing on the left, she has not done anything to address concerns potentially percolating among swing voters. A detailed white paper on Native American policy has no bearing on whether a moderate white suburbanite believes Warren is of good character. And since Warren has apologized for her past claims, she remains open to the charge she was dishonest when, during her academic career, she relied on nothing more than family lore to identify herself as Native American. That means if she becomes the Democratic nominee for president, Warren would still face a “Pocahontas” problem, one that threatens the core of her candidacy. “If she’s the nominee and says, ‘Trump’s dishonest,’ that’s just the immediate counter: You’re dishonest about the most fundamental thing, who you were and how you got to your positions,” said Republican strategist Chuck Warren of the political consulting firm September Group. He is ofno relation to the candidate. Dan Hazelwood, another Republican consultant and owner of Targeted Creative Communications, argued her apologies have missed the mark: “She’s never given the answer to the core of the Trump charge, which is: She cheated. She cheated for personal gain. She hasn’t answered that part of the attack.” An exhaustive Boston Globe investigation in September 2018 concluded Elizabeth Warren’s “claim to Native American ethnicity was never considered by the Harvard Law faculty, which voted resoundingly to hire her, or by those who hired her to four prior positions at other law schools." However, once she was hired, Harvard used her self-identification to help bolster its diversity statistics and tamp down criticism of its hiring practices. The Globe reported, “Warren doesn’t have a direct answer for whether her claims … might have harmed the efforts of others to press for more diversity at the overwhelmingly white institution.” However, these Republicans don’t believe Trump’s preferred rhetorical grenade—the “Pocahontas” slur—poses the biggest threat to Warren. “I don’t think the Pocahontas thing sticks,” Chuck Warren said. “It’s a funny line to people at the rallies, [but] it doesn’t talk much about her character. It almost makes the point trivial.” What would be devastating to Elizabeth Warren is if Trump were able to connect the underlying concerns about her personal integrity to the integrity of her agenda. She styles herself as a warrior for the people, fighting to fix a system “rigged” against them by elites. But if Trump can convince swing voters that Warren, as a member of the academic elite, rigged a system to benefit herself, he could turn what is now Warren’s main strength into a fatal weakness. Key to making that connection is reducing her detailed plans to cheap pandering. “Everybody loves to call her a policy wonk, but everything she is presenting is ‘buy me a vote,'” Chuck Warren said. “She is willing to say, or put on any hat, to get ahead.” Hazelwood envisions Elizabeth Warren’s platform being characterized as “putting the government in charge of everything and giving away stuff for free. … And oh, by the way, the stuff that’s going to be given away is going to be given away by cheaters.” Warren can insist that she never won a job because of how she described her ethnicity. But that hasn’t stopped Trump from attacking her, and Democrats shouldn’t assume the president’s own record of dishonesty will protect her either. “If you give Trump a tool to equalize the playing field, which is what this does,” Hazelwood said, “he will do exactly what he did to Hillary Clinton.”
***
In several presidential elections, Democrats have seen Republican attack dogs disfigure their nominees beyond recognition by turning their strengths into weaknesses. In 2016, Republicans turned Hillary Clinton’s tenure as secretary of State, essential to her case that she was the most qualified for the job, into a deluge of conspiracy theories centered on her private email server. In 2004, Democratic voters thought John Kerry’s war record would protect him from challenges to his patriotism, only to have his war record baselessly but effectively maligned by the “Swift Boat Veterans for Truth.” In 2000, Al Gore had a reputation as a Boy Scout, until George W. Bush's campaign used some of his minor flubs and sloppy phrasings to brand him as a “serial exaggerator.” But when I talked to Democratic operatives who were part of some of these campaigns, and know all too well the potential dangers that lie ahead of any Democratic nominee, they praised Warren for how she, after her DNA test misstep, has seized control of her own narrative with her seemingly unlimited appetite for policy plans. “Warren has successfully defined herself as a candidate, instead of letting others define her,” said Peter Daou, a veteran of the Kerry campaign and the 2008 Clinton campaign. Jesse Ferguson, a Democratic strategist and former spokesman for Clinton’s 2016 effort, concurred, noting Democrats have “struggled” during the Trump era to “drive our own message and not be entirely tethered to his." "She’s shown an ability to do that, and that allows you to navigate his nonsense but also drive your own point,” he said. The Democratic operatives are understandably impressed with Warren’s rise. She is the only 2020 presidential candidate to have a rise. In the Real Clear Politics poll average, no other candidate has increased his or her share of the vote more than 0.5 percentage points since May 1. Warren’s support has nearly doubled, from 8.4 percent to 15.4 percent. Since the first of the year, when Warren began the exploratory phase of her campaign at 4.3 percent, Warren’s support has nearly quadrupled. But Warren started 2019 scraping bottom in the polls, giving her more room to rise, because of the Native American controversy. In early 2018, Warren was scoring in the low double-digits in Democratic primary polling. But her numbers began to sag by the fall, and the obvious cause was Trump’s repeated “Pocahontas” jabs—most prominently, his July “offer” of $1 million to her favorite charity if she proved her Native American ancestry with a DNA test.

warren-dna-tests.jpg

When Warren took him up on it in October, she made her problem worse. She had let Trump dictate the terms of their engagement. Her test results—she had Native American ancestry 6 to 10 generations in the past—did little to defuse the situation. She angered the Cherokee Nation, which rejects the whole concept of DNA to determine tribal heritage. Then in February, when the Washington Post uncovered that Warren self-identified as American Indian on her 1986 State Bar of Texas registration card, she shifted from proudly defending her family lore to sheepishly apologizing for “furthering confusion on tribal sovereignty and tribal citizenship.” Her prospects looked bleak. Her comeback began once she stopped talking about her ancestry and started talking about her plans. Progressive commentators, livid at mainstream media obsession with the Native American saga, as well as with speculation about her “likability,” pushed back by celebrating the substance and reach of her policy proposals. The Nation splashed her on a March cover declaring, “Elizabeth Warren isn’t scared of Trump—or her own party.” In April, the feminist site Jezebel summed up her candidacy with the headline, “Elizabeth Warren Has a Plan.” By May, it was Time magazine that had Warren on the cover with her common refrain, “I Have a Plan for That.” On top of the pile of plans, many voters began to recognize Warren was much better on the stump than some had presumed, leading them to, well, like her. Before the Democratic debate in June, she was back in double-digits. The ancestry controversy went unmentioned in both summer debates. Warren otherwise avoided any serious attacks, and her numbers kept inching up. But her rise has been propelled largely by the left flank of the Democratic Party. In one of her better poll showings, the August Quinnipiac University poll that placed her in second nationally with 21 percent, she won among “very liberal” voters with 40 percent but was well behind Joe Biden among moderate and conservative voters with 11 percent. It’s one thing to make uberprogressives forget about “Pocahontas” with uberprogressive plans, but it’s another to do the same with moderate swing voters.
***
When I asked Democratic operatives whether Warren needs to do something different in order to connect with swing voters and inoculate herself against general election attempts to dredge up the ancestry controversy, they said no. They see in her existing campaign style and persona the ingredients for a favorable matchup against Trump. Tracy Sefl, who handled Kerry’s rapid response operation for the Democratic National Committee and also advised the 2008 Clinton effort, sees a “powerful contrast” between Trump “impulsively shouting out these things and gleefully hurling slurs” from “a stage” and Warren’s “far more engaging and dignified” approach in which she is “literally among voters,” spending “hours worth of [time in] photo lines.”

warren-ancestral-image.jpg

Sefl also praised Warren’s web strategy, creating a webpage—elizabethwarren.com/pocahontas—that tells the story of the real Pocahontas’ abuse and early death to raise awareness of the high rate of violence against Native American women today, mostly perpetrated by nonnatives. Ferguson didn’t buy the Republican argument that Trump would be able to challenge Warren’s honesty. “In 2016, he was seen as a straight talker,” Ferguson said. “But in three years as president, he’s gone from straight talker to straight bullshit artist.” Therefore, “it’s hard to see Donald Trump winning a debate with anyone about honesty and integrity.” These Democratic operatives are hardly naive about the potential power of Republican attacks. “The Republicans are excellent and skilled at taking [what] they can find in their opponents,” Daou said, “and hammer and hammer and hammer away at it, until it becomes a mainstream news story.” Yet he graded Warren as having “passed the test with flying colors—the test of withstanding right-wing attacks.” Ferguson further argued that the Native American controversy isn’t like the Clinton email server episode. “One of the challenges of 2016 was the drip-drip-drip of the email news [and] the investigation news,” Ferguson said. “This isn’t drip-drip-drip. This is Trump beating a dead horse.” But Hazelwood contends the old tricks can still work to drive news. “We’re all kidding ourselves if you [think Trump] can’t find people who are going to stand up and say, ‘I was wronged in this process’ or ‘I’m a Native American and I think this is still inappropriate, and she never actually properly accounted for her misdeeds,” Hazelwood said. Most Native Americans might be disinclined to continue criticizing Warren. Mark Trahant, the editor of Indian Country Today and the moderator of this month’s Native American presidential forum, relayed to me via email that the forum’s attendees “gave her more than a warm reception." "She had one of four standing ovations,” he wrote, and attendees were “far more interested in the candidate’s policy proposals” than the ancestry controversy. But, he also noted, “There are a number of people that will consider Elizabeth Warren’s actions and the DNA test egregious and will never come around.” In fact, four days after the forum, Rebecca Nagle, a Cherokee Nation member and the host of the “This Land” podcast produced by the progressive Crooked Media, published a devastating essay in HuffPost. Nagle argued Warren’s apology was insufficient because her 19th-century and early 20th-century ancestors were white people who occupied Cherokee land with military force and through broken treaties. “Warren’s ancestors replaced the truth of their complicity in Cherokee dispossession with a tale of being Cherokee,” Nagle wrote. In her view, Warren can only make things right by stating she “does not have a Cherokee ancestor and that she was wrong to claim one.” Nagle has no interest in helping Trump. She responded to Warren supporters on Twitter writing, “Warren isn’t running against Trump, she’s running against” the Democratic field. She added: “It’s silly to think not talking about this issue will make it go away. Ppl who want Warren to be prez should press her to resolve this issue now.” But even if Nagle and most Native Americans wouldn’t publicly side with Trump in a general election against Warren, Hazelwood warns Democrats to not pretend that you can’t find those people, because a presidential campaign can.” Whether Warren has the skills to overcome the expected attacks can only be proved in real time, and perhaps Democrats should be thankful that, as Sefl observes, Trump is so impulsive. If Warren continues to rise in the polls and becomes the front-runner, Trump won’t be able resist early engagement. In preparation for that likely confrontation, Warren might want to consider how the last successful Democratic nominee survived a major controversy during a primary. Barack Obama, in March 2008, had to answer for anti-American sermons delivered by his pastor Jeremiah Wright. Obama’s response, the famous “A More Perfect Union” address, was not solely aimed at Democratic primary voters. He delivered a broader discussion of race relations designed to unify all Americans by encouraging a deeper understanding of coarse sentiments harbored by blacks and whites. This not only helped Obama connect with swing voters for the general election, it also helped soothe nervous Democrats who wanted to know if he could handle whatever Republicans threw at him. Warren, in contrast, has yet to tailor a message for swing voters, betting that the ambitious populism that progressives love will also resonate with voters outside of the Democratic primary electorate. The Democratic operatives I spoke with may well be correct that Warren can survive any Republican-manufactured storms by simply being Warren—strong, substantive and on message. That presumes the DNA debacle was an anomalous case of Warren failing to be Warren. Yet it’s risky to assume the Republican operatives are wrong. If her reputation among swing voters gets poisoned by accusations of dishonesty, she will find that extremely hard to remedy, and as before, might respond to pressure by making matters worse. To avoid that pitfall, she should invest energy now in defining herself as “honest.” Without direct mention of the past controversy, she could collect testimonials from her professional past vouching for her integrity and promote them in ads and on the trail. That way, when attacks on her integrity are launched in full force, she will have already fortified her defenses—and in a way that is not reliant on political ideology. “It is risky business to look backwards for the answers to what’s ahead,” Sefl told me, cautioning against the assumption that what worked for Republicans in the past was destined to work again. It’s true that Warren is a different candidate than Clinton or Kerry. And Trump’s weakened political standing as an embattled incumbent might mean he can’t easily run on his playbook from 2016. No two campaigns are the same. But it’s a simple fact that the Native American controversy did once damage Warren’s presidential aspirations and that her recovery has yet to reach most moderate voters. If she has a plan for reaching them before Trump does, we haven’t seen it yet.
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Elizabeth Warren, Progressive Fraud

Postby smix » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:49 pm

Elizabeth Warren, Progressive Fraud
National Review

URL: https://www.nationalreview.com/2017/11/ ... ard-fraud/
Category: Politics
Published: November 28, 2017

Description: The desire to lionize those Donald Trump attacks shouldn’t blind anyone to the great Warren con.

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My favorite Elizabeth Warren story involves a cookbook. Warren, who was at that time posing as a trailblazing Cherokee, actually contributed recipes to a recipe book with the name, I kid you not, “Pow Wow Chow.” But here’s the best part of the story. She plagiarized some of the recipes. Yes indeed, her version of “pow wow chow” came directly from a famous French chef. My second-favorite Warren story involves breastfeeding. She once claimed to be the first “nursing mother” to take the New Jersey bar exam, making her, I suppose, the Jackie Robinson of lactating lawyers. The problem? There’s no evidence this is true. Women have been taking the New Jersey bar since 1895, and the New Jersey Judiciary was “not aware” whether they tracked the nursing habits of test-takers. Warren is a bit of an academic grifter. She’s willing to fake her way to the top. When she came to Harvard Law School, she was — believe it or not — considered by some to be a “minority hire.” She listed herself as a minority on a legal directory reviewed by deans and hiring committees. The University of Pennsylvania “listed her as a minority faculty member,” and she was touted after her hire at Harvard Law School as, yes, the school’s “first woman of color.” This was no small thing. At the time, elite universities were under immense pressure to diversify their faculties (as they still are). “More women” was one command. “More women of color” was the ideal. At Harvard the pressure was so intense that students occupied the administration building, and the open spaces of the school were often filled with screaming, chanting students. One of the law school’s leading black academics, a professor named Derek Bell, left the school to protest the lack of diversity on campus. I remember it vividly. I was there. I arrived on campus in the fall of 1991, just after Bell left, and liberal activists were seething with outrage. They were demanding new hires, and the place almost boiled over when the school granted tenure to four white men. My classmate, Hans Bader, notes that the school wasn’t just under political pressure to make a “diversity” hire, it was under legal pressure as well. The Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination had issued a “probable cause finding” that the school had discriminated against a professor named Clare Dalton when it denied her tenure. In Bader’s words, “Harvard’s faculty badly wanted to racially and sexually diversify their ranks to show their commitment to diversity, so that MCAD would not view future denials of tenure to unqualified minorities and women as being motivated by a discriminatory animus.” No one can know whether Warren would have landed at Harvard without faking her ethnicity (Harvard of course denies her alleged minority status was a factor), but we do know that she spent years holding herself out as a Native American. We do know those claims were extremely dubious. We also know that she made those claims exactly at the time when they could most help a young career.

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These facts would be bad enough, but the great Warren con doesn’t end there. Let’s take, for example, her signature work of academic scholarship. She made a name for herself in the pre-Obamacare years with a pair of studies claiming that medical bills were responsible for an extraordinary share of American bankruptcies. This research presented the Left with an ideal talking point. The American medical system wasn’t just broken, it was oppressing the little guy. No doubt medical bills do drive some bankruptcies, but you wouldn’t know how many from Warren’s scholarship. As Megan McArdle points out in a detailed take-down in The Atlantic, Warren and her co-authors not only classified a “medical bankruptcy” as any bankruptcy that included at least $1,000 in medical debt (in her 2001 paper) or $5,000 (in her 2007 paper), their methodology was “quite explicitly designed to capture every case where medical bills, or medical loss of income, coexist with some other causal factor — but the medical issues are then always designated as causal in their discussion.” Warren’s work even obscured the fact that medical bankruptcies fell dramatically between 2001 and 2007. McArdle noted, “This is, to put it mildly, sort of a problem for the thesis that exploding medical bills are shoving people into bankruptcy.” McArdle’s conclusion was devastating:
Does this persistent tendency to choose odd metrics that inflate the case for some left wing cause matter? If Warren worked at a think tank, you’d say, “Ah, well, that’s the genre.” On the other hand, you’d also tend to regard her stuff with a rather beady eye. It’s unlikely to have been splashed across the headline of every newspaper in the United States. Her work gets so much attention because it comes from a Harvard professor. And this isn’t Harvard caliber material — not even Harvard undergraduate.

It’s a neat trick Warren’s accomplished. She’s likely leveraged her fictional Native American heritage into a plum spot at Harvard Law School. She leveraged her Harvard job to foist garbage scholarship on a gullible media. And now she has leveraged all of that into a plum Senate seat, from which a multimillionaire Ivy League professor has recast herself as progressive populist heroine. But it turns out that past ideologically convenient incompetence is a good predictor of future ideologically convenient incompetence. Her signature public achievement (aside from trash-talking Donald Trump on Twitter) is proposing and helping establish the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), an unconstitutional monstrosity that was designed to exist above and outside our nation’s system of checks and balances. Last year, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the CFPB was “unconstitutionally structured.” Its opinion was not subtle. According to the Court,
The CFPB’s concentration of enormous executive power in a single, unaccountable, unchecked Director not only departs from settled historical practice, but also poses a far greater risk of arbitrary decisionmaking and abuse of power, and a far greater threat to individual liberty, than does a multi-member independent agency.

But wait, there’s more:
In short, when measured in terms of unilateral power, the Director of the CFPB is the single most powerful official in the entire U.S. Government, other than the President. Indeed, within his jurisdiction, the Director of the CFPB can be considered even more powerful than the President. It is the Director’s view of consumer protection law that prevails over all others. In essence, the Director is the President of Consumer Finance.

The Constitution doesn’t provide for bureaucratic god-kings. The CFPB’s structure was rotten from its inception — more bad fruit from Warren’s poisonous tree. Yesterday Donald Trump made headlines when he once again called Warren “Pocahontas.” This time in front of Navajo “code talkers” — heroic veterans of World War II. Outrage abounded, but it was disproportionate to the offense. Yes, Trump was rude, but Warren is still the primary offender here. The desire to lionize the victims of Trump’s wrath should blind no one to Elizabeth Warren’s progressive fraud.
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Op-Ed: I am a Cherokee woman. Elizabeth Warren is not.

Postby smix » Mon Sep 16, 2019 2:39 am

Op-Ed: I am a Cherokee woman. Elizabeth Warren is not.
Think Progress

URL: https://thinkprogress.org/elizabeth-war ... c6c91b696/
Category: Politics
Published: November 30, 2017

Description: "As Native people, we are relegated to being invisible, while Warren is not."

warren-wagon.jpg

For 72 hours this week, news headlines focused on President Donald Trump’s offensive usage of the name “Pocahontas” when he referred to Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) at an event to honor Navajo Code Talkers on Monday. As a young Cherokee woman, one would assume that I would take Warren’s side in standing up against Trump’s racist remark. Following the incident, Warren lambasted the president, telling MSNBC that Trump has done “this over and over thinking somehow he’s going to shut me up with it. It hadn’t worked in the past, it is not going to work in the future.” A real Native American hero, right? Wrong. She was not a hero to me when she failed to foster a haven of support for Native students within Harvard University’s alienating Ivy League culture. She is not a hero for spending years awkwardly avoiding Native leaders. She is not a hero because, despite claiming to be the only Native woman in the U.S. Senate, she has done nothing to advance our rights. She is not from us. She does not represent us. She is not Cherokee. The controversy over Warren’s identity stems from the 1990s, when Warren was a professor at Harvard Law School. The university promoted her and celebrated her as the first minority woman to receive tenure. When the Boston press dug up these reports during Warren’s campaign for Senate in 2012, she stated she didn’t know why Harvard had promoted her as Native American. It appears that Warren categorized herself as a minority when it served her career and later dropped the marker after gaining tenure. In defending her supposed Native identity, Warren has drawn from both racist stereotypes and easily refutable stories about her family. At a 2012 press conference Warren stated that her family knew her grandfather was “part” Cherokee because “he had high cheekbones like all of the Indians.” Cherokee genealogists have pored through her family history to find that “None of her direct line ancestors are ever shown to be anything other than white, dating back to long before the Trail of Tears.” To add insult to injury, despite Warren’s public claims of Native American heritage, she has decidedly avoided talking with Native leaders and, in 2012, refused to meet with a group of Cherokee women at the Democratic National Convention.



As Cherokee Nation citizen and community activist David Cornsilk told me, “We don’t get to celebrate her, because we don’t know her. She is not related to us, she does not live in our community. She is not our conduit to the Senate. We are not celebrating her in the Tribal newspaper. Elizabeth Warren is nothing to us, so we have no inroad to that powerful operation that affects our daily lives.” Warren’s misrepresentation of her heritage has major consequences for Native Americans, who have little visibility not only in politics, but in American culture at large. Warren’s claims of Cherokee identity make her the only representation of Cherokees that the average American will likely ever see. I challenge non-Native readers to name another Cherokee leader in elected office. Or any Native American holding elected office in the United States. Or a contemporary Native American author. A Native American movie star. A Native American athlete. Or any famous Native people who are alive today. What is beyond maddening is that, as Native people, we are relegated to being invisible, while Warren is not. As a mixed Native woman, I have to relive the racist stereotypes Warren spits out to defend her alleged Native identity everyday. People constantly ask me, what part Cherokee are you? Who in your family was Cherokee? That’s so nice that you embrace your Native heritage. I am not part Cherokee. There is not one member of my family who was Cherokee. I am Cherokee. I am an enrolled citizen of Cherokee Nation and a member of my home and urban Indian communities. We are living, real, and whole people; not fractions of Indians who used to be real. “Non-Native people need to recognize their own limitations and that we, native people, are experts on our own communities. When they argue against us from a place of ignorance, they are actually dismissing us and disappearing us,” Cornsilk said. As contemporary Native Americans, we live in the space between Donald Trump and Elizabeth Warren, between the stereotypes that were created to excuse the wholesale slaughter of our people and the stereotypes that were created to excuse the wholesale appropriation of our identity and cultures. The Trumps and Warrens of the world leave very little space for us to exist — which, when you understand the history of the United States, makes perfect sense. Trump casually throws around the word “Pocahontas,” but few are aware of the traumatic history it evokes — one that mirrors the grim reality that Native women face everyday. The fictional Disney character Pocahontas is based on a real Powhatan teenager named Matoaka, who was actually kidnapped and held hostage by White settlers. She died in England at the age of 21. Today, four in five Native women will be raped, stalked or abused in our lifetime and nine out of 10 of the perpetrators are non-Native. If Warren wanted to be true to her supposed Native identity, she would have done well to do more than just stand up for herself — she would have stood up for her people. As one of the statistics — a Cherokee woman and a survivor — Elizabeth Warren does not speak for me. Sen. Warren needs to accept responsibility for misappropriating Native identity for her own economic and political gain. To help her, I have drafted an apology, which she has my full permission to appropriate. Every last word:
I am deeply sorry to the Native American people who have been greatly harmed by my misappropriation of Cherokee identity. I want to especially apologize to the over 350,000 citizens of Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the United Keetoowah Band. In my family, there is an oral history of being Cherokee, however, research on my genealogy going back over 150 years does not reveal a single Native ancestor. Like many Americans who grew up with family members claiming to be Cherokee, I now know that my family’s stories were based on myth rather than fact. I am not enrolled in any of the three Federally recognized Cherokee Tribes, nor am I an active member of any Cherokee or Native American community. Native Nations are not relics of the past, but active, contemporary, and distinct political groups who are still fighting for recognition and sovereignty within the United States. Those of us who claim false Native identity undermine this fight. I am sorry for the real damage that Native Americans have experienced as the debate about my false identity has revived the worst stereotypes and offensive racist remarks, all while Native people have been silenced. I will do my part as a Senator to push for the United States to fully recognize tribal nations’ inherent sovereignty and uphold our treaty obligations to Native Nations. I will use my national platform to advance the rights of Native Americans and I commit to building real relationships in Indian Country as an ally and supporter.



Elizabeth Warren’s DNA test hurts Native people
Think Progress

URL: https://thinkprogress.org/elizabeth-war ... 68a5977da/
Category: Politics
Published: October 18, 2018

Description: Warren is playing into a non-Native agenda to define and control the parameters of who counts as "Native American."

warren-persist.jpg

After years of Trump and other Republican leaders bullying Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) to take a DNA test to “prove” her claims of Native ancestry, she gave in. The 2020 presidential hopeful spit in a cup, sent off for the results, created a campaign style video, a website — with a Google search result ad for her name — and a full report so that the world would see the results. In a political context where Native Americans are defending the legal structure that defends our rights — tribal sovereignty — from a serious legal attack based on myths about race, Warren’s insistence at defending her claims to Cherokee heritage at all costs is dangerous, self-serving, and harmful. In response to Warren’s highly orchestrated media roll out, the Cherokee Nation released a statement that her use of the DNA test was “inappropriate and wrong” and that her continued claim to Cherokee heritage is “undermining tribal interests.” The present controversy is a perfect storm of public ignorance, racist stereotypes, and governmental and scientific exploitation of our identities that plays into a non-Native agenda to define and control the parameters of who counts as “Native American.” On Tuesday, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) even weighed in, announcing on Fox and Friends that he will take a DNA test to prove he is “more Native American than Elizabeth Warren.” This is not an innocent conversation among family members in a private living room, but a debate between two U.S. senators and a sitting president. These people set the federal policies that govern Native bodies, lands, and who is and who is not legally an “Indian.” It’s important that non-Native people walk away from this mess with the correct conclusion that Native people are the authority on who is and who isn’t Native. Non-Native people claiming authority over our identity is dangerous in the United States: a country that has always sought to control who is and who is not “Indian” in a way that limits Native rights and opens our land, children, and culture up for theft. That so many people in power truly believe that a DNA test result is enough to claim a relationship to any Native American tribe is deeply disturbing. The $10 billion DNA test industry, and the science behind it, has a long and ethically fraught history with Native people. After centuries of having our bones, ancestors, and sacred artifacts stolen by scientists and academic institutions, many Native Americans were reluctant to offer up our blood. When the burgeoning science of genetic analysis came on the market, this blood became a hot commodity. Historically, bio specimens were often collected from Native people for genetic research under questionably ethical rules of consent that are no longer scientifically or legally accepted. In 2004, the Havasupai Tribe sued Arizona State University and banished employees from entering their reservation after specimens taken to help the tribe research diabetes were misused. The science behind Warren’s specific DNA test used examples of Indigenous people from Mexico, Peru, and Colombia, and included no sample from anyone who is Cherokee or even another Native American tribe from the Southeast (Cherokee traditional homelands). The test only shows that Warren may have an ancestor who was from North, Central, or South America. While international borders are a colonial construct, so is the idea that a diverse population of Indigenous people spanning from present day Alaska to Chile are a racially homogenous group that can be easily and conclusively categorized. Scientists would not give the same credibility to a DNA test that grouped people from England to Tokyo, but Whiteness has always made itself distinct. Native identity is about a relationship to a tribe. Native Americans are not a pan-Indian racial group, but rather citizens of sovereign Nations. DNA tests have no way to determine tribal heritage and it’s a gross misinterpretation of both the science and tribal sovereignty to claim that they do. While Warren may not have used her Native ancestry claims or her DNA test for economic gain, other people have and are. Last month, a man living in the suburbs of Seattle sued the state of Washington for status as a minority business owner based on the results of a DNA test. He tested at 6 percent Indigenous. Currently, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is facing backlash after his brother-in-law’s business was awarded $7 million in no-bid federal contracts from a program design to help minority businesses. William Wages’ claims to Cherokee identity did not match federal records investigated by the Los Angeles Times and a leading Cherokee genealogist. Wages is a member of the “Northern Cherokee Nation,” a self-identified group that has no recognition from the federal government and is considered fake by tribes that do. Today, over 400 such groups exist, all claiming to be Cherokee. Kim Tallbear (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate), a leading scholar on Native DNA, is worried that fake groups like the Northern Cherokee could use DNA tests to fight for the same status as Native American tribes. “The office of federal acknowledgement already uses anthropological, historical and other disciplinary evidence to make determinations about whether a tribe should get federal recognition or not,” she told ThinkProgress. “There is nothing stopping [them] from using genetic ancestry tests. I am worried that these fraudulent groups can tie up the federal recognition process based on genetic ancestry alone.” Warren could have put this issue to rest years ago by simply apologizing for listing herself as a minority during her academic career and for touting her supposed Native American heritage over the years, and by admitting she made a mistake, which she still refuses to do. (Warren’s office did not immediately return ThinkProgress’ request for comment.) While Warren states she does not have Cherokee citizenship, the distinction likely won’t transfer to the broader U.S. public, which will understand a DNA test to be a true indication of her right to claim Cherokee identity in some way. This is because many Americans know nothing about tribal citizenship, Cherokee history, or Native identity. Today, many of Warren’s supporters question the authority of Native people to comment on who is and is not Native. “By extension, they question the authorities of the Native nations from which we hail and whose citizenship rules and kinship laws we uphold,” said Tallbear. Due to attacks from far right organizations like the Koch Brothers-backed Goldwater Institute, tribal sovereignty and Native rights were already on fire. Warren just added fuel to the flames. While Native people are scrambling to put the fire out — answering questions and dispelling myths about blood quantum, DNA tests, tribal enrollment, and Cherokee history — we need help. We need a public and leadership that not only understands tribal sovereignty, but respects it. Without that, we are threatened with losing the small pieces of rights, sovereignty, and land we have left.
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Elizabeth Warren's 'part' Cherokee claim is a joke, and a racist insult to Natives like me

Postby smix » Mon Sep 16, 2019 1:21 pm

Elizabeth Warren's 'part' Cherokee claim is a joke, and a racist insult to Natives like me
USA Today

URL: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/ ... 668763002/
Category: Politics
Published: October 18, 2019

Description: There is nothing innocent about a white woman claiming her ancestors experienced genocide. Democrats that tone deaf can't represent people of color.

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The day after a CNN public opinion poll ranked Elizabeth Warren fourth among possible Democratic 2020 hopefuls, the Massachusetts senator released the results of a DNA test along with a campaign-style ad defending her family’s story of Cherokee heritage. Warren’s decision to cave to President Donald Trump’s demands was an affront to many Native Americans, who have long stated that DNA tests cannot be used to claim Native heritage or relationship to a tribe. Cherokee Nation, the largest tribe in the United States, agrees. In a public statement, the tribe called Warren’s use of a DNA test “inappropriate and wrong,” and said the senator “is undermining tribal interests with her continued claims of tribal heritage.” Neither Warren nor the Democratic Party has responded to the statement. Warren’s position presents Democrats with two options: ignore concerns raised by Native Americans and the Cherokee Nation, or hold a politician accountable for behavior that a marginalized group has labeled harmful. As a registered Democrat, Cherokee Nation citizen and Native woman, I hope both party leaders and average blue-voting citizens will choose the latter. As Cherokee genealogists have researched, and I have repeatedly written about, Warren descends from a long line of well-documented white people. While Warren no longer identifies herself as Native American, she still publicly claims her family is “part” Cherokee. There is nothing innocent about a white woman claiming her ancestors experienced genocide and ethnic cleansing — an inescapable fact for Cherokee families — when they did not. Why is this so hard to understand?
Native American rights and status under assault
For the average American, the barrier is the lack of exposure to real information about Native identity, Cherokee history and tribal sovereignty. Rather than providing much needed public education, the news coverage over the Warren debate perpetuates harmful myths about Native identity — such as blood quantum, DNA tests and family lore — while real information about one of the most invisible and underrepresented groups in America is rarely published. If Democrats choose to ignore or deflect the concerns raised by Native advocates and a tribe, they will add to this already troubling dynamic. Rather than correcting harmful misconceptions about Native identity, Warren perpetuates them. When questioned by reportersin 2012, she argued that her family knew they were Native because some relatives had high cheekbones, "like all of the Indians do." And now, in publishing this DNA test, the senator is perpetuating a dangerous myth that Native identity is determined by racial biology — a position the right is using to attack the heart of tribal sovereignty and Native rights. The DNA test Warren took only shows (and not conclusively) that she may have an ancestor who was indigenous to Mexico, Colombia or Peru. Using this test to support her claim of Cherokee heritage is not only false based on the science, but also perpetuates a common and racist stereotype that Native Americans are a homogeneous group. In the USA alone, there are 573 distinct and sovereign, federally recognized tribes. Rather than being a racial category, Native Americans are a political group whose rights as citizens of indigenous nations are based on our treaty relationship to the United States. This long established political status is under an existential legal threat. Earlier this month, a Republican-appointed judge in Texas struck down the Indian Child Welfare Act, a landmark law for Native rights, calling it a race-based statute that violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution. In a similar move this spring, the Trump administration ruled that Native Americans are not exempt from Medicaid work requirements because — even though our access to health care is guaranteed by our treaty rights — Natives can’t receive special treatment based on race. The legal structure defending Native rights is on fire. Warren, in a tone deaf and politically motivated move, just poured gasoline on the flames. What is at stake for Warren and Democrats is who will be the next president of the United States. What is at stake for the Cherokee Nation is the future of our tribe, which generations of our ancestors have fought to keep intact.
Will Democrats support Warren, or their base?
The decision about what to do with Warren strikes the center of Democrats’ identity crisis. Will they cater to white swing voters or build a coalition that meaningfully includes people of color, the party’s most reliable — though rarely prioritized — voter base? Democrats cannot build a truly diverse base if every time a marginalized group within the party brings up legitimate concerns about racism, we are told to be quiet. In the past, I have said that if Warren renounced her claims of Cherokee ancestry, I would publicly support her. After Monday, I can’t. At this point, the debate about Warren has done enough harm to Native Americans that it simply needs to stop. I am a registered Democrat who has voted blue in every election since I first cast a ballot for John Kerry when I was 18 years old, but I cannot support a candidacy that will come at the expense of my people. Democrats who support Native rights need to get behind a different candidate.
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Elizabeth Warren scrubs website of Cherokee ancestry claims

Postby smix » Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:53 pm

Elizabeth Warren scrubs website of Cherokee ancestry claims
New York Post

URL: https://nypost.com/2019/08/19/elizabeth ... ry-claims/
Category: Politics
Published: August 19, 2019

Description: Elizabeth Warren’s team removed the parts of her campaign website that included her controversial claims of having Native American heritage, including DNA test results that showed she had only minuscule amounts of Indian ancestry. Warren’s website until Sunday included a video of the Massachusetts Democratic senator getting the results of the DNA test, showing that she had between 1/64th and 1/1024th Native American ancestry, The Daily Caller reported. Warren at the time said the results proved her claims throughout her academic career that she has Cherokee ancestry, a claim the Oklahoma native said was based on “family lore.” The claims — and shaky DNA test results — prompted ridicule and charges that she was trying to advance her career by claiming to be a member of a minority group. President Trump has repeatedly called her “Pocahontas,” which some Native American leaders have called a racist slur.

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CNN reported Sunday that her campaign planned to scrub parts of Warren’s website about her heritage in an effort to reboot her campaign as she has risen in the polls. The network said Warren had met with Native American leaders, and apologized in private for exaggerating her ancestry claims. Warren addressed the controversy during a speech Monday at a Native American forum in Sioux City, Iowa. “I am sorry for harm I have caused. I have listened and I have learned a lot, and I am grateful for the many conversations that we’ve had together,” she said.
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